Level 1 badge.

The a11y challenge

We know YOU are on board with accessibility, but how do you convince your clients, the CEO and other stakeholders?

This quiz will help you think through some of the arguments, and build a solid case for accessibility. As each case is different, you’ll need to take your own approach. That might be a presentation, a workshop or mentoring.

1. What do the initials WCAG stand for?

A

We Create Awesome Greatness

B

Web Creation Accessibility Gurus

C

Web Content Accessibility Guidelines

Guidelines

The correct answer is Web Content Accessibility Guidelines.  

Disabled people just want to use the web, and the guidelines help designers and developers make this easy.  The Guidelines are a tool that can help make the accessible web. But accessibility is more than guidelines. It's about making a good experience for disabled people.

WCAG

There are three levels - A, AA and AAA, with a total of 78 guidelines. We'll show you how to easily incorporate the most important ones with Webflow and then continue to cover the rest.

2. Accessibility is nice to have, right? It’s a decent thing to do.

A

Only if it makes us more money

B

We don’t have any disabled users, so we don’t need to worry about this.

C

Of course - it’s good to be kind to everyone

Moral obligation

If accessibility is just nice to have, then sometimes it’ll be pushed to the back of the queue, if we have time at the end. Which there never is.

3. Are there laws about accessible websites?

A

We’ve got insurance. We’ll deal with this when someone takes us to court.

B

Sure, and we’ll do what we have to do to not break the law

C

Accessibility isn’t about the law, it’s about real people who just want to use the web

Law

Don’t ask "what’s  the minimum legal requirement?" or "what do we have to do?". Disabled people are real and want to use the web you build. Give them some respect. And the chances of them taking you to court are very slim. If they can’t use your site, they’ll just go somewhere else.

4. Do you have a company mission statement?

A

Yeah, but no one thinks about it much

B

No, but the boss said something about inclusion the other day

C

It’s the bedrock of everything we do

Culture

Look at the organisation's mission statement, the blurb in your policies, speeches by anyone high-up. Look for implied inclusion, and use this as your argument for accessibility. Domino’s Pizza has a list of values, one of which is “Do the right thing, because it's the right thing to do“. But they still want to argue that it is not clear that making their website accessible to blind people is failing the Americans with Disabilities Act 1990.

5. Have you thought about the social model of disability?

A

Er… what do you mean?

B

To be honest, I don’t think about disability a lot, but I’m happy to be learning.

C

Sure. People are disabled by the bad decisions designers and developers make.

Social model of disability

The social model of disability suggests that people aren't disabled, they have impairments. But they are disabled by bad decisions made by designers and developers. A product as a concept is accessible to everyone until it gets designed. Development decisions filter people out, rather than accessibility being added.

6. Do you embed accessibility thinking into your development process?

A

Hey, we design what our client wants.

B

We test our sites with Google Lighthouse and always score above 90. That’s great isn’t it?

C

Sure, we have a column in our workflow especially for checking accessibility at every stage.

Design and development process

Whether you go straight from pencil and paper sketches or Figma designs to Webflow, it’s great to think about accessibility from the big concepts - color, size, keyboard, forms, alternatives to visuals (that's hard when you’re a visual designer, no?). Remember, the whole web is accessible, until you start designing.

7. How much money are you missing out on by NOT doing accessibility?

A

It’s all about the money.

B

That’s what the CEO wants to know. What’s the ROI (return on investment)?

C

We’re really not sure, but we want everyone to have the same opportunities to shop with us.

The Purple Pound (the money spent by the disability community)

There are lots of disabled people, and they do spend money. But proving the ROI is hard. Because knowing who is disabled is hard.

Stats

The total disposable income for working-age people with disabilities is about $490
billion in the USA.

In the UK it's £11.75 billion.

8. Did you know that making your website accessible helps with SEO too?

A

I’m a designer, I’m not really bothered about SEO.

B

Really? I want in

C

Yes, and we work hard to build a good page structure.

SEO (Search engine optimisation)

There isn't an exact correlation between SEO and accessibility but Google bots depend on good heading structure, alt text, link text, and title tags to index sites. If you want to improve your free ranking then progressive enhancement is the way to go.

9. Do you want your website to work as well on a 36” retina screen as on an Apple Watch?

A

I like designing for Internet Explorer 11, thanks.

B

You mean Webflow breakpoints aren’t enough?

C

Ah, yes, page regions are really helpful for this.

Robustness

Robustness is accessibility speak for the way your site works on different devices.

By developing your site well you can make sure it displays how you want on any device. So if you want Apple to display your site on their Watch you need to build it with good region tags. That way it will display the right content for the right device.

10. How do you build a site that works well for anyone anywhere?

A

I’ve checked the site on my Mac Book Pro and iPhone, in the studio, and it works great. So we're good to go.

B

We use an online site checker for different devices to see how things look and feel.

C

We test our sites on old mobiles, using just one hand to control. We know people use the web in difficult circumstances, but we still want them to have a great experience.

Environmental and situational use

High contrast is super important, especially when you add strong ambient light. Optimise for one-handed use on small screens. Twitter and Facebook stats say that over 80% of all posted videos are viewed with the sound off... so make sure there are captions.

11. Do you think about how your web content might be consumed in new ways?

A

Oh, like people listening to websites on Amazon Alexa or Siri?

B

Oh, you mean having a transcript of a podcast so that people can quote you on Twitter?

C

Oh, you mean making things accessible makes things better for everyone?

Building for everyone, everywhere

If you make it so that the words, the images, the videos can all be consumed in different ways you’re building the accessible web. And that’s good for everyone.

Domino's Pizza now have an app for every device - you can order on any hardware, including while driving home in your Ford.


Level 1 badge.
Level up

Webflow accessibility